American ASSOCIATION
of poison control centers


TRACK EMERGING HAZARDS

AAPCC works with America's 55 poison control centers to track poisonings and their sources, including household products, food and beverages, chemicals in the workplace and home, environmental toxins, drugs and medicine, and animal and insect bites and stings.

Click on a topic below to review recent data from the National Poison Data System (NPDS) on novel substances, emerging hazards, and outbreaks.

COVID-19 BULLETINS

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, AAPCC is working with poison control centers to track common exposures and provide awareness for prevention. Two common exposures include hand sanitizers and cleaning products. Click one of the buttons below to download the latest COVID-19 Bulletin.


EMERGING HAZARD ALERTS

E-CIGARETTES AND LIQUID NICOTINE

The experts at America's poison control centers continue to be concerned about exposures to e-cigarette devices and liquid nicotine.

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HAND SANITIZER

The amount of alcohol in hand sanitizer ranges from 40% to 95%. A  child ingesting any more than a taste of hand sanitizer could be at risk for alcohol poisoning. 


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LAUNDRY DETERGENT PACKETS 

Highly concentrated “single-load liquid laundry packets” can cause serious harm to young children. 


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OPIOID (NARCOTIC)
PAIN MEDICATIONS 

NPDS statistical analyses indicate that all analgesic exposures including opioids and sedatives are increasing year over year. 


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SYNTHETIC CANNABINOIDS

Use of synthetic cannabinoids, or “synthetic marijuana” can cause dangerous health effects including psychotic episodes and seizures. 

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CANNABIDIOL
(CBD) 

Poison control centers have seen an increase across all ages for Cannabidiol (CBD) cases since 2014. 

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AAPCC maintains the National Poison Data System (NPDS), the national database of information logged by America’s poison control centers (PCCs) serving the District of Columbia and all U.S.’ states and territories. Case records in this database are from self-reported calls from health care professionals, emergency response personnel, and the public. As such:

  • NPDS data does not represent the complete incidence rate of national exposures to any substance(s)
  • NPDS data is subject to change due to continuous improvements to the database.
  • AAPCC is unable to completely verify the accuracy of every report made to PCCs

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